HALLOWE’EN DISCO

  HALLOWE’EN DISCO

GYM HALL

TUESDAY 30TH OCTOBER

 

Halloween-Kids

Primary 1 – 3          6pm – 7pm

Primary 4 – 7        7.30pm – 8.30pm 

£3.00 entry

Don’t forget to bring pennies for some yummy cakes and fun games! 

We are raising money for SCIAF this year.

We would be delighted for any donations of home baking for our stall.

All donations can be handed into the school office on Mon 29th & Tues 28th. 

Dress up and come along and join in the fun!

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THE CHRISTIAN ORIGINS OF HALLOWE’EN

Hallowe’en is a name that means nothing by itself. It is a contraction of “All Hallows Eve,” and it designates the vigil of All Hallows Day, more commonly known today as All Saints Day. (Hallow, as a noun, is an old English word for saint. As a verb, hallow means to make something holy or to honour it as holy) It begins the three-day observance of All Hallow tide, the time in the liturgical year dedicated to remembering the dead, including Saints (hallows), martyrs, and all the faithful departed.

Both the feast of All Saints Day (November 1) and its vigil (October 31) have been celebrated since the early eighth century, when they were instituted by Pope Gregory III in Rome. A century later, the feast and its vigil were extended to the Church at large by Pope Gregory IV. Today, All Saints Day is a Holy Day of Obligation.

Throughout Britain, Halloween has traditionally been celebrated by children’s games such as bobbing for apples in containers full of water, telling ghost stories and the carving of faces into hollowed-out vegetables such as swedes and turnips. These faces would usually be illuminated from within by a candle, the lanterns displayed on window sills to ward off any evil spirits. The current use of pumpkins is a relatively modern innovation imported from the United States.

Later, Christian elements came into play, as All Hallows’ Day (All Saints’ Day) and All Souls’ Day contributed their own unique traditions to the core, such as trick or treating (collecting “soul cakes” on All Souls’ Day) and dressing up in frightening costumes as protection against evil spirits.

At no time, either in the Celtic religion nor in the Christian, was Halloween history connected with the devil or devil worship.

Once Hallowe’en came to America from Ireland and Scotland, other cultures have added their own elements to the modern American celebration – vampires, werewolves, etc.

At St Joseph’s we focus teaching on All Saints Day and All Souls Day during this week, remembering those who have gone before us and teaching the children how to pray for them.  We have Mass on All Saints Day and prayers in the chapel and in class, to teach them about this special time of the year in the Church calendar. The Hallowe’en disco is nothing more than a chance to dress up and have fun together and is in no way a celebration of evil.

 

 

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